It was all a dream…

Jamal Woolard, who portrays Biggie in the film (AP Photo/ January 7 2009)

Jamal Woolard, who portrays Biggie in the film (AP Photo/ January 7 2009

I remember the day Notorious B.I.G. was killed. I was in Kansas City at my Grandfather’s house, and I remember seeing the news scroll across the bottom of the TV screen in his kitchen. I didn’t cry, but I do remember saying, “Oh no not another one!”  I was 8 years old at the time.

When I found out about the production of a Notorious biopic, I was extremely excited. I don’t remember much from the time when he was living, but I always connected to his music. As I grew older, I was always curious about him, especially with all of the gossip and rumors surrounding his personal life.

My friends and I decided to go see the film on opening night. Apart from the rowdy crowd, (constantly talking back to the screen,  yelling “BROOKLYN” every time they saw Brooklyn Bridge) it was an enjoyable evening.

The movie Notorious was executive produced by Sean “Diddy, Puffy, Puff Daddy, P. Diddy” Combs and Biggie’s mom Voletta Wallace, so there was potential for bias.  After watching the film however, I was pleasantly surprised. The story was very revealing, and well told, highlighting the ups and downs of the life of a talented young man. The casting for the movie was great, I felt like all of the actors did their characters justice, especially having Christopher Wallace Jr., Biggie’s son, portray his father.

Right before he was gunned down, Biggie was in the process of turning his life around. He wanted to be a better man, and a better father to his two children. The tone of his music had even changed. It teaches you a valuable lesson, to always live your life to it’s greatest potential, and not to neglect the gifts that God gives you.

I always wondered what would happen if Biggie and Tupac were still alive today, what would hip hop culture be like? Would they still be rhyming? Would Soulja Boy still  be cranking and birdwalking? What do you think?